Formulating Waterborne Paints

Ask an Expert From: Products Finishing, ,

Posted on: 9/1/2001

Question: I am trying to use a six-carbon aliphatic ester as a coalescing agent for waterborne paints.

Question:

I am trying to use a six-carbon aliphatic ester as a coalescing agent for waterborne paints. However, I have a problem. In some resin systems there is foaming and an increase in viscosity over days, but in some resin systems these phenomena did not occur. What do you think are the causes? What are some good reference books for one trying to learn the basics and formulation of waterborne paints? S.C.

Answer:

I haven't done any formulating for ten years. Furthermore, Painting Clinic is not the forum for that activity. However, I never like to pass up a challenge. And this is really a challenge because I don't know your ester nor do I know your resin types.

It is well-known that viscosity increase in waterborne paints is common. It can be caused by polymerizing or by hydrogen bonding. But what do I know? I'm just a kid from Dunbar, PA. Aside from literature published by resin suppliers, your best source of references for formulating waterborne paints is The Federation of Societies for Coating Technology. They have recently (in the last 10 years, or so) published a series of booklets on formulating. Their address is:

Federation of Societies for Coating Technology
492 Norristown Road
Blue Bell, PA 19422-2350
Phone: 610-940-0777
Fax: 610-940-0292
www.coatingstech.org

 



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