Humidity Affects Paint Drying

Question: Concerning the question in the July 2005, Painting Clinic, regarding the gentleman, D.


Question:

Concerning the question in the July 2005, Painting Clinic, regarding the gentleman, D. W., experiencing paint drying problems during the winter (low R. H.) months: Many manufacturers of “Moisture Cured” polyurethane paints also offer a catalyst that will provide the necessary reaction to complete the drying process. This is especially helpful if you have a very large paint bay or a booth where high volume of air turn-over makes it difficult to keep moisture content at a constant level. The downfall of using a catalyst is that the paint usually has a shorter pot-life than is normally specified in their literature. Individual users will need to weigh the benefits and drawbacks for their particular situation. But I would recommend checking with their paint manufacturer. R. A.

Answer:

Thank you for your comments, R. A. I couldn’t have said it any better. After reviewing his e-mail, it is obvious D. W. works for a smaller manufacturer whose account is not important to the paint supplier. From your e-mail, I see you work for a large company, as I did when I had a real job. Because of the volume of paint the larger companies buy, the paint suppliers are ever present. We had a guy who practically lived at one of our plants (they made refrigerators and freezers). I worked at the corporate Research Labs and really didn’t buy any paint, but I tested and recommended it. I used to have to beat paint suppliers away from my door. After I became a consultant, I realized the smaller accounts rarely see their paint suppliers. As a result, folks like D. W. have to ask around to get answers to questions their paint supplier should have addressed.

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