Researchers Say Superhydrophobic Coating Protects Without The Price

Scientists come up with new class of superhydrophobic nanomaterials might simplify the process of protecting surfaces from water.

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A new class of superhydrophobic nanomaterials might simplify the process of protecting surfaces from water. A material made by scientists at Rice University, the University of Swansea, the University of Bristol and the University of Nice Sophia Antipolis is inexpensive, nontoxic and can be applied to a variety of surfaces via spray- or spin-coating.

 

The researchers led by Rice chemist Andrew Barron reported their find in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

 

The hydrocarbon-based material may be a "green" replacement for costly, hazardous fluorocarbons commonly used for superhydrophobic applications, Barron said.

 

"Nature knows how to make these materials and stay environmentally friendly," Barron said. "Our job has been to figure out how and why, and to emulate that."

 

To read more about the research, please visit: http://www.ecnmag.com/news/2015/12/superhydrophobic-coating-protects-without-price