EPA Adds Three Compounds to Aerosol Regulation

The EPA published a direct final rule to add three compounds to a March 2008 rule establishing volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions standards for aerosol coatings; rule aimed to reduce ozone formation by encouraging reductions in VOCs that have high reactivity.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on March 9 published a direct final rule to add three compounds to a March 2008 rule establishing volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions standards for aerosol coatings. The 2008 rule aimed to reduce ozone formation by encouraging reductions in VOCs that have high reactivity.

The American Coating Association had petitioned EPA in December 2009 to add the compounds to Table 2A, Table of Reactivity Factors.  In California, the corresponding table is known as the Table of Maximum Incremental Reactivity (MIR) Values.

To read more from the ACA on the topic, please click HERE

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