Atotech Launches Trivalent Chromium Hard Chrome Plating Process

Atotech launches BluCr, an industrial trivalent chromium hard chrome plating process designed as a safe alternative to hexavalent hard chrome plating.

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Atotech launches BluCr, an industrial trivalent chromium hard chrome plating process designed as an alternative to hexavalent hard chrome plating.

According to Atotech, hard chrome plating is one of the simplest processes in electroplating that generates a deposit with excellent physical properties, used over the last 90 years. Despite superior wear resistance and corrosion protection, the company says, hard chrome coatings are subject to stringent legal restrictions.

BluCr is hexavalent chromium and boric acid-free, complying with REACh regulations. The product aims to reduce the hazardous nature of hard chrome plating and the potential risks to the environment and personnel.

The BluCr process utilizes either mixed metal oxide or graphite inert anodes for plating, enabling the hard chrome plating industry to move away from the use of toxic lead alloy anodes. As a result, BluCr acts as an alternative to Cr6-based hard chrome plating processes used in the automotive, construction and oil and gas industries.

BluCr is said to exhibit the same benefits associated with Atotech’s hexavalent chromium processes. This includes fast plating speed and bath stability in addition to high hardness deposits and wear resistance.

“With BluCr, Atotech pushes innovation to a new level,” says Rami Haidar, global product manager from Atotech’s functional chrome team. “The trivalent chromium hard chrome deposits look and behave like the familiar hexavalent chromium deposits. They even show a superior chloride resistance. Those benefits make the transition from one to the other relatively easy for the industry.”

For more information, visit atotech.com.

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