The Voice of the Finishing Industry since 1936

  • PF Youtube
  • PF Facebook
  • PF Twitter
  • PF LinkedIn
6/1/2002 | 1 MINUTE READ

Heat-Resistant Paint

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Question: I hope you can help with my paint question.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Question:

I hope you can help with my paint question. We just moved into a house with a fireplace that has a round metal chimney that goes up two-stories to the ceiling. Apparently, the previous owners used the wrong paint or process to paint this chimney white, and with only a couple of months use now, the paint is cracking and peeling. Our painter said he couldn’t find heat-resistant paint in white and thought it would be easier to replace the whole thing. A fireplace guy says there’s got to be a way to properly treat and/or paint the thing. I called another professional painter who says that this was a first for him. I can’t believe this is all that rare. There’s got to be a relatively simple solution. It will have to be stripped obviously, but what are my options for repainting the thing? J.H.

Answer:

Heat-resistant paints are available. Some of these products were developed as an off-shoot of the Space Program. Furthermore, many of the coatings used are white in color. Many of the heat-resistant paints are based on silicone and (other) modified silicone resin technology. I suggest you check paint stores that handle or have access to maintenance and industrial paints. They are out there; you’ll just have to dig them up.

 

Related Topics

RELATED CONTENT

  • Curing Oven Basics

    Simply heating up the substrate does not cure the coating. There are many variables to consider when choosing the best cure oven for your application...

  • Conveyors and Paint Systems

    Choosing the right conveyor system, coating technology, and ancillary equipment.

  • Masking for Surface Finishing

    Masking is employed in most any metal finishing operation where only a specifically defined area of the surface of a part must be exposed to a process. Conversely, masking may be employed on a surface where treatment is either not required or must be avoided. This article covers the many aspects of masking for metal finishing, including applications, methods and the various types of masking employed.


Resources