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10/1/2002 | 1 MINUTE READ

Powder Coating PVC?

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Question: I have a product that I am trying to get to market.

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Question:

I have a product that I am trying to get to market. It is made from 0.75-inch PVC pipefittings. I would like to know if powder coating PVC would be possible, as I would like to have a more manufactured appearance. I am hoping to find a finish that would hide the butt joints of the fittings. Thank you very much for any advice you may have on this matter. R.N.

Answer:

 Thermosetting powder coatings need to cure at temperatures above 250F (normally 350F or higher), which will soften or melt your PVC pipefittings. Furthermore, they cannot be applied at a sufficient film thickness to hide butt joints on PVC fittings.

Thermoplastic powder coatings are designed to flow smooth at lower temperatures, however, these temperatures may still soften your PVC fittings. Because your product is made from PVC, applying thermoplastic powder coatings using electrostatic spray techniques can prove problematic. I suppose you can use a "Flame-Coat" spray apparatus, but this may also soften your product.

My advice to you is to find some other way to finish your product or build your product out of metallic fittings and then powder coat it. Copper comes to mind, but be prepared for higher material costs. Good luck.

 

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