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10/1/2002

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Question: We use 5/8 x 1 inch ceramic cylinders.

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Question:

We use 5/8 x 1 inch ceramic cylinders. When they are worn down to 3/8 inch diameters they create a lodging problem, and we have been throwing them away. We are concerned that this is wasteful. What is your view on this?

Answer:

You buy and dispose of media on a weight basis. If you weigh about ten pieces of worn down media you will find that they weigh less than 25% of ten new pieces. So, you have gotten over 75% of the total value of the media. The ideal situation is to have another finishing machine that can use it for parts without the lodging potential. The sharp angles are gone, but sometimes that doesn't matter, or may be an advantage. If you can't use it, you may be able to sell it to someone who can. Note that new 3/8 inch cylinders are higher priced than 5/8 inch cylinders.

 

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