4/18/2018 | 1 MINUTE READ

Dragonfly-inspired Nano Coating Kills Bacteria Upon Contact

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Scientists say studies show that wings of dragonflies and cicadas prevent bacterial growth due to their natural structure. The surfaces of their wings are covered in nanopillars making them look like a bed of nails.

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The wings of dragonflies and cicadas inspired a group of researchers from the Agency for Science, Technology and Research's Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN) to invent an anti-bacterial nano-coating that could be used to disinfect frequently touched surfaces such as door handles, tables and lift buttons.

The scientists say studies have shown that the wings of dragonflies and cicadas prevent bacterial growth due to their natural structure. The surfaces of their wings are covered in nanopillars making them look like a bed of nails.

When bacteria come into contact with these surfaces, their cell membranes get ripped apart immediately and they are killed. This inspired researchers from the IBN to invent an anti-bacterial nano coating for disinfecting frequently touched surfaces such as door handles, tables and lift buttons. This technology will prove particularly useful in creating bacteria-free surfaces in places like hospitals and clinics, where sterilization is important to help control the spread of infections. Their new research was recently published in the journal Small.

“There is an urgent need for a better way to disinfect surfaces without causing bacterial resistance or harm to the environment. This will help us to prevent the transmission of infectious diseases from contact with surfaces,” says IBN Executive Director Professor Jackie Y. Ying.

 


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