4/2/2018 | 1 MINUTE READ

Former WH Chief Economist to Speak at NASF Washington Forum

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Dr. Doug Holtz-Eakin served as chief economist of President George W. Bush’s Council of Economic Advisors in 2000-2001 and was director of the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office in 2003-2005. 

Dr. Doug Holtz-Eakin will kick off the NASF Washington Forum on Tuesday, April 17, at the Ritz Carlton-Pentagon City, in Washington, D.C.

Considered one of the nation’s top economists, Holtz-Eakin has served at the highest levels of government and is well-known on Capitol Hill and among Washington’s top think tanks. He served as chief economist of President George W. Bush’s Council of Economic Advisors in 2000-2001 and was director of the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office in 2003-2005. He also reportedly was on President Trump’s short list of replacements for departing White House advisor Gary Cohn.

Holtz-Eakin has a diverse, multifaceted economic background, having been involved in policy, politics, academia and government, and he will give a 360-degree view of the economy in his presentation at the two-day Washington Forum. His discussion will include what the future holds for tax and trade policy, a budget outlook, regulations and more. A distinguished economic advisor, academic and strategist, Holtz-Eakin also will forecast policy changes on the horizon and recommend strategies for mitigating potential risks to the industry. His discussion of recently announced tariffs on steel and aluminum imports will be followed by speakers from the automotive industry, who will address how these tariffs may affect the automotive supply chain and what the finishing industry can do about.

For information, visit nasf.org.

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