1/17/2018 | 1 MINUTE READ

Michigan Bill Targets PFAS

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The $23.2 million allocation will provide testing, monitoring and technical assistance at more than a dozen sites across Michigan where PFAS have been found in groundwater.

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The Michigan House of Representatives recently passed Bill 4320, which provides a $23.2 million allocatin for testing, monitoring and technical assistance at more than a dozen sites across Michigan where per- and polyfouorakyl substances (PFAS) have been found in groundwater, including at Camp Grayling. These chemicals are sometimes used in metal finishing.

“These funds are critically important for our community,” says State Representative Daire Rendon of Lake City. “The money will be used to help determine the extent of PFAS contamination in and around Camp Grayling, aid in remediation efforts and help families affected by PFAS by increasing health services through county health departments.”

The funding will also pay for improvements to the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality’s water testing laboratory, which is not currently equipped to test for PFAS.

“Water samples from homes in Grayling are currently shipped out of state because none of the water testing facilities in Michigan have the capability to test for PFAS. Right now families have to wait about eight weeks for results,” Rendon says. “Upgrading the state’s DEQ laboratory will ensure a reliable, timely response for our residents.”

She says the legislation requires any private or public entity responsible for PFAS contamination, including the U.S. Department of Defense, to reimburse the state.

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