3/7/2018

Valence Wichita Receives Approvals from Boeing, Bombardier

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The Kansas facility now holds hardness and conductivity approvals from Airbus, Cessna, Spirit, Boeing and Bombardier. 

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Valence Surface Technologies received new Boeing and Bombardier approvals for hardness and conductivity testing at its Wichita, Kansas, facility, formerly known as Chrome Plus International.

Valence Wichita, which has capability for parts as long as 12 feet, now holds hardness and conductivity approvals from Airbus, Cessna, Spirit, Boeing and Bombardier. An additional site in Grove, Oklahoma, has capability for parts as long as 26 feet, and extensive Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman approvals in addition to commercial aerospace approvals.

Between these two Midwest locations, Valence Surface Technologies offers a range of finishing services, including non-destructive testing (NDT); shot peening; chemical processing; plating; honing and grinding; various spray coating applications (primer, topcoat, dry lube); and value-added sub-assembly services. In addition, the company offers pick-up and drop-off services to customers in Wichita and throughout the Midwest.

With 10 locations, more than 530,000 sq. ft. of manufacturing space, more than 2,500 unique industry approvals and more than 16 million parts processed per year, the company is one of the world’s largest independent providers of special processing services to the aerospace and defense industries.

 

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