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8/3/2017

Oxford Instruments Industrial Analysis Becomes Hitachi High-Tech Analytical Science

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Hitachi High Technologies Corp. has acquired Oxford Instruments Industrial Analysis for a consideration of £80 million (approximately $94.5 million), creating a new company that will expand its industrial analytical solutions offerings.

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Hitachi High Technologies Corp. has acquired Oxford Instruments Industrial Analysis for a consideration of £80 million (approximately $94.5 million), creating a new company that will expand its industrial analytical solutions offerings.

The new company, Hitachi High-Tech Analytical Science, brings together Hitachi High Technologies’ extensive scientific instrumentation portfolio with Oxford Instruments’ 40-year heritage of analytical instruments and services. The collaboration will offer the companies a wider ranging product portfolio, as well as more contact points with customers and more chances to meet customer needs, Hitachi High-Tech says.  

“Today, we already help thousands of businesses streamline their costs, minimize risk and increase production efficiency,” says Dawn Brooks, managing director of Hitachi High-Tech Analytical Science. “The combined strengths of Hitachi and Oxford Instruments Industrial Analysis greatly increases our capability to offer an ever-wider range of leading-edge analytical solutions to our customers around the world”.

The new company is headquartered in Oxford, U.K., with research and development and assembly operations in Finland, Germany and China, and sales and support operations in a number of countries around the world.

For more information, visit hitachi-hightech.com/hha.

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