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3/18/2019 | 1 MINUTE READ

Plastonics Celebrates 60 Years

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The business started in East Hartford, Connecticut, but then moved to their current Hartford location in 1973 and now has 30,000 square feet.

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Plastonics, a third-generation coating company in Hartford, Connecticut, that was founded in 1959 by Robert Zimmerli Sr., is celebrating its 60th anniversary.

Zimmerli’s son, Bob Zimmerli Jr., started working at Plastonics in 1973. Since Robert retired in 1988, Bob is now the owner and chief executive officer. His son, Brian Zimmerli, is the vice president of operations.

The business started in East Hartford, Connecticut, but then moved to their current Hartford location in 1973 and now has 30,000 square feet.

“Our diversification of processes and coating materials is appealing to a wide range of industries,” Bob Zimmerli says.

Specializing in powder coat finishes, they have three different coating processes, along with a variety of coating materials. The classic electrostatic spray method is a great option when thin coatings are required on projects, including formed sheet metal and large springs. Fluid bed dip process is a method used when thicker coatings are needed for items such as surgical brackets, medical trays, material handling baskets and bus bars. Their mini coat tumble process is unique for coating small parts such as clips, springs and hooks with high-volume production, a process that lends itself the flexibility of total encapsulation and provides a much more cost-effective way to coat smaller items.

Visit plastonics.com.

 

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