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UV-Radiation Resistant Coating May Aid Disinfection Efforts

NEI’s new UV-C radiation resistant coating shows promise in helping protect surfaces that are being disinfected using UV-C — a method of cleaning surfaces that is gaining interest during the evolving COVID-19 pandemic.

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UV resistant coatings

Source | NEI Corp.

NEI Corp. (NEI, Somerset , N.J.) has recently developed a short-wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UV-C) resistant coating known as NANOMYTE TC-4001-UVP. The material shows promise in helping protect surfaces that are being disinfected using UV-C,  a method of cleaning surfaces that is gaining interest during the evolving COVID-19 pandemic. Ultraviolet radiation in the 100nm – 280nm wavelength range, also referred to as UV-C, is increasingly being considered as a means for disinfecting surfaces that large numbers of people are likely to come in contact with, such as parts of transit systems, theme parks, cinema theaters, public restrooms, airports, and other areas of high traffic. However, UV radiation causes significant damage to painted surfaces by creating free radicals that then cause polymer degradation.

According to NEI, NANOMYTE TC-4001-UVP, film that is only 1/5 mil (5 microns) thick, shows an ability to block radiation below 350nm. The transparent coating is reportedly a single component formulation designed to protect metals and other surfaces from degrading, preserving their structural integrity and appearance. The coating is a composite consisting of organic and inorganic phases. It is said to resist scratching and chipping and has the ability to adhere to bare, pretreated, or painted metal surfaces. A variety of other surfaces may be coated as well, such as plastics and composites. The coating can be applied by immersion, spraying or brushing, in thicknesses ranging from microns to mils, and is available in glossy or matte finishes.

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