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2/27/2017

1,000°F Gas-Heated Cabinet Oven Supports High-Temperature Curing

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Currently used for curing metal coatings onto parts, the No. 887 gas-fired 1000°F cabinet oven from Grieve features 175,000 BTU/HR installed in a modulating natural gas burner provide heat.

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Currently used for curing metal coatings onto parts, the No. 887 gas-fired 1000°F cabinet oven from Grieve features 175,000 BTU/HR installed in a modulating natural gas burner provide heat, while a 2,000 cfm, 2-hp stainless steel recirculating blower furnishes a horizontal airflow across the workload.

The unit’s workspace dimensions measure 38" × 38" × 38" with 8" thick insulated oven walls consisting of 2" of 1,900°F block and 6" of 10 lb./cf density rockwool insulation. This cabinet oven also features an aluminized steel exterior, Type 304, 2B finish stainless steel interior, as well as inner and outer door gaskets that seal against the door plug and the front face of the oven.

All safety equipment is included as required by IRI, FM and NFPA Standard 86 for gas-heated equipment, including a 325 CFM, ⅓-hp powered forced exhauster. A digital indicating temperature controller is also provided.

For more information, visit grievecorp.com

 

 

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