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Grieve 500°F Clean Room Oven Used for Drying Baskets of Parts

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Grieve’s No. 923 is an electrically-heated 500°F Class 100 clean room cabinet oven currently used for drying precision parts in baskets.
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Grieve’s No. 923 is an electrically-heated 500°F Class 100 clean room cabinet oven currently used for drying precision parts in baskets. Workspace dimensions are 36" × 36" × 51", and 30 kW are installed in Incoloy-sheathed tubular heating elements, while a 1,500-cfm, 2-hp recirculating blower provides horizontal airflow to the workload.

Features include an aluminized steel exterior finished with white epoxy paint; #4 brushed finish stainless steel door cover and control panel face; Type 304, 2B-finish stainless steel interior with continuously backwelded seams; and 4"-thick insulated walls. Double front doors with positive latching hardware are also included.

The oven also has two 30" × 24" × 6"- thick stainless steel, high-temperature, recirculating HEPA filters; and easily removable ductwork to expose the filters for inspection and replacement. Controls include a digital indicating temperature controller, manual-reset excess temperature controller with separate contactors, recirculating-blower airflow-safety switch and solid-state contactors.

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