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6/28/2017 | 1 MINUTE READ

Automated Grit Blasting Machine Designed for Medical Implants

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Guyson Corp. introduces its latest twin spindle, automated grit blasting machine built and designed for medical implant devices.

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Guyson Corp. introduces its latest twin spindle, automated grit blasting machine built and designed for medical implant devices. The Dual Expanded Two-Station RXS-400 system offers simultaneous dual operation and the front enclosure serves as a device that controls media egress by capturing and returning any dust and residual media back to the machine hopper.

The machine also offers noise reduction by surrounding the sliding vertical doors through which the parts enter and exit the blast chamber. Incorporated is a twin spindle feature allows for two-part flow.

For reclamation, a Model 75/12 Cyclone was used. The suction of the reclaim system constantly draws all spent and reusable media and the air from the finishing chamber. Once in the cyclone body, the reusable media is centrifugally separated from the fractured media and debris, which is removed from the system by the dust collector. The reusable media remains in the system and is recirculated through the gun.

To balance the reclaim system and ensure negative pressure in the finishing enclosure, a continuous cleaning D-1000 dust collection unit was selected. The continuous cleaning feature incorporated in the Guyson collector is designed for efficient operation. The company recognizes the importance of supplying customers with visual indication that are used to balance the reclaim system. Proper negative pressure is critical when media/dust egress is not allowed.

For more information, visit guyson.com.

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