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2/10/2006

Brush-On Finishing Gels

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Intended for finishing large surfaces, the brush-on Finishing Gels cling to vertical surfaces and stay where they are applied without forming runs and drips or bleeding onto adjoining surfaces.

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Intended for finishing large surfaces, the brush-on Finishing Gels cling to vertical surfaces and stay where they are applied without forming runs and drips or bleeding onto adjoining surfaces. After cleaning the surface, remove oil, fluxes and tarnish, the gels are applied liberally with a synthetic paintbrush. The reaction time takes about 2-8 minutes, depending on the depth of color desired. When the desired depth of black or brown tone is achieved, the gel can be rinsed off with a wet sponge and the surface dried. The resulting finish adheres tightly and can be highlighted or distressed, if desired. A clear topcoat appropriate to the end use of the surface is the final step. One popular and durable topcoat is a satin-gloss urethane lacquer, topped with paste wax, for excellent protection with an attractive appearance.

Three different types of Gel products are available:   PRESTO BLACK® GEL for black on iron and steelwork such as staircases, railings, custom furniture, architectural elements and hand-forged parts; ANTIQUE BLACK® GEL for silver/black on copper, brass and bronze parts and ANTIQUE BROWN® GEL for attractive brown tones on copper, brass and bronze.

 

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