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7/18/2013 | 1 MINUTE READ

Elcometer Probes Boost Coating Thickness Measurement Speed

Originally titled 'Probes Boost Coating Thickness Measurement Speed'
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Elcometer’s Ultra/Scan probes for the Elcometer 456 coating thickness gage are designed to be dragged across a coated surface without damaging the probe or the coating, and increase the gage’s reading rate to more than 140 readings per minute.

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Elcometer’s Ultra/Scan probes for the Elcometer 456 coating thickness gage are designed to be dragged across a coated surface without damaging the probe or the coating, and increase the gage’s reading rate to more than 140 readings per minute. They can be used as traditional coating thickness probes, or to measure in either scan or auto-repeat modes.

Each probe has been designed to take a snap-on, replaceable end cap so that the sliding action across a coated surface does not cause wear to the probe tip, helping to maintain the accuracy of the probe over its life. The gage’s patented offset feature excludes the thickness of the cap from any coating thickness measurement and accounts for the any effect on the cap. The gage also will display a warning message when the wear cap needs to be replaced.

Scan Mode enables users to slide the probe continuously across  the entire surface area and, upon removing it from the surface, see the average, highest and lowest readings, as well as whether they are inside or outside any pre-determined limits. As the probe slides across the surface in Auto Repeat Mode, individual readings are stored in the gage’s memory at a rate of more than 140 readings per minute.

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