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2/21/2014

Enthone Adjustable Leveler in Acid Copper Process Eliminates Defects

Originally titled 'Adjustable Leveler in Acid Copper Process Eliminates Defects'
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Enthones’ Cuprostar 1600 acid copper process features adjustable leveler capabilities that eliminate the potential for defects such as orange peel, flame patterns and overleveling.

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Enthones’ Cuprostar 1600 acid copper process features adjustable leveler capabilities that eliminate the potential for defects such as orange peel, flame patterns and overleveling. It produces brilliant and highly ductile copper layers with high leveling, consistent adhesion and exceptional throw, the company says.

The dye-based process is highly tolerant to pores, making it well-suited for plating of plastic parts and bulk components with complex shapes. When used as part of an Enthone decorative copper-nickel-chrome system, Cuprostar 1600 is said to provide high yields and low rejects rates on virtually all commonly used base materials. Its stable brightener additives are designed for consistent production performance with low consumption. The copper deposits can be used as an intermediate layer for use with nickel-chromium systems on plastics as well as on metal.

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