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11/24/2008

Industrial Bench Grinder

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The Dayton industrial bench grinder from Grainger is designed for grinding, cleaning, deburring, chamfering and sharpening activities.

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The Dayton industrial bench grinder from Grainger is designed for grinding, cleaning, deburring, chamfering and sharpening activities. Built for continuous, efficient use, the 8-inch wheel grinder is designed to handle heavy stock removal to finishing applications. The heavy duty capacitor motor supplies the extra current needed during start-up and operation under load. An extended wheel-to-motor clearance can easily handle longer items, according to the manufacturer. Dynamically balanced rotors and sealed bearings minimize vibrations and ensure a smooth operation, and the grinder also features adjustable tool rests, safety glasses and an exclusive single port dust collection system.

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