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Robotic Paint Atomizer Allows for Real-Time Diagnostics

ABB’s Ability Connected Atomizer combines a sensor-equipped atomizer with the company’s Ability digital system, allowing for real-time smart diagnostics and precise paint control to optimize painting quality.

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ABB’s Ability Connected Atomizer combines a sensor-equipped atomizer with the company’s Ability digital system, allowing for real-time smart diagnostics and precise paint control to optimize painting quality. According to the company, this will allow automakers, for example, to optimize painting quality in real time during application rather than following a quality inspection after painting is completed.

The design of the system’s externally charged atomizer increases paint transfer efficiency and reduces paint waste by 75 percent between frequent color changes, the company says. It also doubles the operating time between manual cleaning from two to more than four hours, meaning the system is easier to maintain, and can stay online and productive longer without over-spray contamination.

Connecting the sensor-equipped atomizer to the ABB Ability digital system allows for monitoring of key atomizer components such as bell cups, air motors and shaping air rings, as well as variables such as acceleration, pressure, vibration and temperature. This can boost paint transfer efficiency by as much as 10 percent while the paint is being applied, the company says, and also eliminates the need for costly downtime for repainting or touchups.

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