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10/13/2014

Thin Wheel Design Wastes Less Material in Cutting Applications

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Norton Saint-Gobain upgrades their Norton Gemini RightCut wheels, now 100 percent A/O abrasive.

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Norton Saint-Gobain upgrades their Norton Gemini RightCut wheels, now 100 percent A/O abrasive. They are infused with a new bond technology and process for a thinner wheel design and low kerf loss.

The .045" thinness of the wheels result in less material waste and quick cutting action, the company says. This provides a clean, precise, straight, burr-free quality cut. The wheels are designed to be 20 percent faster cutting than a standard wheel, as well as longer lasting. According to the company, they extend wheel usage 70 percent more than conventional wheels. Additionally, the wheels require less pressure while cutting, giving operators a more comfortable, easier-to-use solution.

The wheels are a cost-effective  solution for portable, guarded right angle grinders and are ideal for numerous metal slotting and cut-off applications, including cutting on bolts and studs, angle iron, tubing and sheet metal in a variety of materials ranging from carbon to stainless steel. Type 01 (4" - 7") and Type 27 (4" - 9") wheels are available.

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