XRF System Measures Coatings on Large Components

Bowman’s L Series of desktop x-ray fluorescence (XRF) instruments are designed for measuring thicknesses of plated deposits ranging from aluminum to uranium on components as large as 22" × 24" × 13".

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Bowman’s L Series of desktop x-ray fluorescence (XRF) instruments are designed for measuring thicknesses of plated deposits ranging from aluminum to uranium on components as large as 22" × 24" × 13". They can measure as many as five coating layers simultaneously, any or all of which can be alloys, the company says.

Key features include a micro-spot-focus x-ray tube and temperature-stabilized silicon PIN diode detector.  The detector is said to have well-defined element peaks, eliminating the need for secondary filters. Minimal peak position drift ensures high stability over time and extends the interval between recalibrations. The standard L Series configuration also includes a four-position multiple collimator assembly and a micro-focus video camera synchronized with the x-ray optics. The Xralizer software combines intuitive visual controls with time-saving shortcuts, extensive data searchability and “one-click” reporting.

In addition to testing large parts, L Series instruments are said to be well-suited for fixtured components and for applications requiring multi-point measurement.

Bowman / 847-781-3523 / bowmanxrf.com

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