9/22/2017

Combining 3D Printing and Electroplating for Replicable Experimentation

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Andreas Osterwalder calls his office a museum: what looks like a collection of small machines are 3D printed and partially electroplated parts that the scientist has been creating for his experiments.

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A great story about the latest on plating and 3D printing from formlabs.com, which tells the story of Andreas Osterwalder.

From formlabs.com:

Andreas Osterwalder calls his office a museum: what looks like a collection of small machines are 3D printed and partially electroplated parts that the scientist has been creating for his experiments at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL).

Experimental setups like Osterwalder’s beamsplitter function as highly complex machines, and turning a research idea into the actual experiment can easily take months or even years. A common bottleneck is the actual fabrication of specific customized components.

With the help of a electroplating company specialized in rapid prototyping parts, Osterwalder has found a method to expedite and lower the cost of advanced experimental setups using 3D printing and electroplating.

To read more, visit HERE

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