Benchtop Analyzers Handle Complex Parts, Ultra-Thin Coatings

Hitachi High-Tech Analytical Science’s benchtop FT110A and FT150 energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analyzers can be used for measuring a range of metal finishing and electronics applications.

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Hitachi High-Tech Analytical Science’s benchtop FT110A and FT150 energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analyzers can be used for measuring a range of metal finishing and electronics applications, including large parts with complex geometries and ultra-thin coatings on small features.

The FT110A includes several features to measure difficult-to-handle parts. The large chamber can be configured with either a fully enclosed or slotted door, and the auto-focus routine allows for measurements to be taken as far away as 80 mm from the sample surface. The auto-approach function offers one-touch positioning of the X-ray components at the ideal distance for reproducible results.

Well-suited for analyzing ultra-thin coatings on fine structures, the FT150 features a polycapillary optic that focuses the X-ray beam to a diameter of less than 20 microns, directing more intensity on the sample and measuring features smaller than is possible with traditional collimation.  A high-sensitivity, high-resolution Vortex silicon drift detector takes full advantage of the optic to measure nanometer-scale coatings on microelectronics and semiconductors. A high-precision stage and high-definition camera with digital zoom also allow for quick positioning of sample features to improve throughput.

 

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