ELECTROPLATING WHITEPAPERS

Electroplating

Iron Tungsten Alloy Plating with Low Friction and Wear Resistance

The modern automotive industry has been striving to reduce energy loss caused by friction. An alloy plating film developed by finely crystallizing iron and tungsten demonstrates both a high level of hardness and excellent ductility. In addition, low friction can be achieved by its application under a layer of lubricant. It also has the merit of greater cost performance as compared with DLC produced with PVD technology.
#vacuum-vapor #energy #plating

Electroplating

Research and Decorative Coatings - The 19th William Blum Lecture

This article is a re-publication of the 19th William Blum Lecture, presented at the 65th AES Annual Convention in Washington, DC, on June 26, 1978.
#plating #research

Electroplating

Technical Communication - The 20th William Blum Lecture

This article is a re-publication of the 20th William Blum Lecture, presented at the 66th AES Annual Convention in Atlanta, Georgia, on June 25, 1979.
#plating #research

Electroplating

Electrodeposition of Ni-Fe-Mo-W Alloys - 16th Quarterly Report

16th Quarterly Report - AESF Research Project #R-117. This NASF-AESF Foundation research project report covers the 16th and final quarter of this project work (October-December 2016).
#research #plating #nasf

Electroplating

Crack Formation during Electrodeposition and Post-deposition Aging of Thin Film Coatings - 4th Quarterly Report

Fourth Quarterly Report - AESF Research Project #R-118. This NASF-AESF Foundation research project report covers the fourth quarter of project work (October-December 2016).
#nasf #research #plating

Electroplating

The Nature, Cause and Effect of Porosity in Electrodeposits: A Microscopic Examination of Nickel-Chromium Coatings after Atmospheric Corrosion

This paper is one of seven reports constituting AES Research Project #13, dealing with the nature, cause and effect of porosity in electrodeposits, performed at the then-National Bureau of Standards, in Gaithersburg, Maryland. It was one of several seminal articles produced through AES Research during the height of the automotive/decorative segment of the surface finishing industry in the 1950s and 60s.
#automotive #research #plating

Electroplating

Production Schedule Driven Automated Energy Management

Surface finishing line process automation systems are normally designed to optimize production throughput and assure compliance with operating parameters such as time-in-tank. The basic elements of automated energy management on process lines are control of energy consumption in active, standby and inactive states, primarily by ventilation, heating and cooling, agitation and filtration. This paper presents a case study of the new process control model.
#management #surfin #energy

Electroplating

Don’t Believe Everything You Hear - The 22nd William Blum Lecture

This article is a re-publication of the 22nd William Blum Lecture, presented at the 68th AES Annual Convention in Boston, Massachusetts, on June 29, 1981.
#research #plating

Electroplating

Can Electroplated Fe-C be an Environmentally Friendly Alternative to Hard Chromium and DLC Coatings?

Electroplated FeC is an efficient surface treatment based on non-aggressive chemicals with a deposition rate of ~20 μm/h at a process temperature of 50°C.  The FeC coating is carbide-free and temperature stable up to ~250°C with a hardness of 750 HV, which is comparable to frequently applied hardened steels.  The FeC coating has reasonable friction properties and have high affinity towards lubricants because of incorporated amorphous carbon.  Hence, for certain applications, the FeC coating might be an interesting wear-protective alternative to hard chromium and to PVD-deposited low-friction diamond-like carbon coatings (DLC’s), which are rather difficult and costly to deposit on larger items.  
#surfin #vacuum-vapor #research

Electroplating

Defects in Hard Chromium Deposits Part I: Causes and Cures

The causes of and remedies for defects in hard chromium deposits are explored in the first of this two-part P&SF article from 1984.  Photomicrographs and SEM (scanning electron microscope) photo­graphs will illustrate that most defects in various hard chromium deposits arise from defects in the basis metal. These defects may be in the original metal surface or may be caused by preplate finishing. Homogeneous hard chromium deposits can be produced only by eliminating these defects. Practical suggestions and procedures will be given.
#surfin #research #plating